Light and fast: poached salmon with avocado sauce and quinoa tabbouleh

Late Spring cooking should be fresh and easy.  With all of the wonderful fruits and veggies making their way into the markets, there’s plenty of reasons to put a quick and delicious meal on the table once in a while.

This dinner, inspired by my leafing though Bon Appetit magazine which I started receiving free for some unknown reason, takes about 25 minutes tops.  Plus it’s healthy, fresh, seasonal, and delicious, especially when enjoyed at sunset on the patio.

Start by cooking off your quinoa so it has a chance to cool.  Then prepare your poaching liquid.  Poaching salmon is about as easy as it gets, and there’s really no guesswork involved. Bring your liquid just to a boil, turn off the heat, plop in your salmon, and wait 10-15 minutes (depending on how pink you like your center).

And the sauce is also a breeze, throw everything in the blender and give it a whirl.

While your salmon is poaching you can finish off your quinoa tabbouleh.  Quinoa is a superfood!  It’s a cinch to make (see below) and is a complete protein high in plenty of vitamins.  Eat it often.  It has a bit of a nutty flavor on its own served hot, but also goes well in cold salads.  The tabbouleh is crunchy from the hothouse cucumbers, tangy from the acids, and fresh tasting from the parsley.  A winner with the salmon and creamy avocado sauce.

25 minutes to a healthy dinner your family will love.  Ain’t that a treat.

Poached Salmon with Avocado Sauce

Serves 2
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 20 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 lb salmon (preferably fresh and wild)
  • 3 cups stock (chicken, vegetable, or fish)
  • 1 cup dry white wine
  • 2 sprigs thyme (or tarragon (but then omit wine and add more stock))
  • 2 avocados
  • 1 cup plain yogurt
  • 1/2 lime, juice and zest
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cumin

Optional

  • Chives (chopped)

Note

Adapted from Bon Appetit

Directions

1. Cut fish into 2 portions and season with salt and pepper
2. Bring stock and wine just to a boil, then throw in thyme. Remove from heat and add salmon. Let stand until cooked to medium-rare (about 10-15 minutes). Remove salmon and transfer to plate. Chill if desired.
3. Make sauce by scooping avocado, yogurt, lime zest and juice and cumin into blender or food processor. Blend until combined, then season with salt and pepper and additional lime juice if needed.
4. Spoon avocado sauce on bottom of plate and layer salmon on top. Drizzle with olive oil and garnish with a lime wedge and chives if desired.

Quinoa Tabbouleh

Serves 4
Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 25 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup quinoa (rinsed)
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice, plus zest
  • 1 clove garlic (minced)
  • 1 hothouse cucumber (or 2 persian cucumbers)
  • 1 pint cherry tomatoes (halved)
  • 1/3 cup flat leaf (italian) parsley (chopped)
  • 1/4 cup fresh mint (chopped)
  • 2 scallions (sliced thin)
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil (good quality)

Note

Adapted from Bon Appetit

Directions

1. Bring quinoa, 1 1/4 cups water and a pinch of salt to a boil. Reduce heat to simmer and simmer until quinoa is tender, about 10 minutes. Let stand covered for 5 minutes, then fluff with fork. Let cool.
2. In a bowl whisk lemon juice, olive oil, and season with salt and pepper.
3. Mix quinoa with cucumbers, tomatoes, onion, and herbs. Mix in dressing and season to taste.
4. Will keep one day in refrigerator.

Healthier Indian Food: Saag Paneer

I have a weak spot for Indian food and make Big N take me to one of our favorite local places (here and here) about once a week.  It’s the spices that I can’t get enough of.  That, and the fact that nearly every dish is served in a creamy fattening blow-me-away sauce.  I think Big N is on to my trick of ordering way more food than we can possibly eat in one sitting so I can have Indian for lunch (and breakfast, I’m that bad) the next day.

Frying salmon cakes Though I consider myself something of a “spice goddess” in my own kitchen (you should see my spice rack!), I’ll let Bal Arneson borrow the name for her delightful show on the Cooking Chanel. Making chutney   From her show I’ve been learning there are healthier ways to make Indian food at home and she’s inspired me to experiment with my own recipes.  The other night I made her recipe for salmon fish cakes with apple chutney. (But I didn’t have figs or almonds so I used pears and cashews in my chutney, still yummy).  Her recipe called for paneer cheese, and since I was going to go through the trouble of making paneer from scratch, I thought why not serve my salmon cakes with some delicious saag paneer (spicy spinach with Indian cheese)?

Saag paneer If you’ve ordered saag paneer from different Indian restaurants, you know that there is a sliding scale of goodness.  One dish I had tasted like it was made with canned spinach, yuck.  Another version came with paneer that was so dry my teeth squeaked as I chewed.  I prefer the creamier version of saag paneer with a slightly firm but not too dry paneer.  The trouble is most restaurant versions are made with tons of ghee and/or heavy cream.  I wanted to cut some calories from my homemade dish.  After several attempts, I believe I finally achieved a great home version of saag paneer that’s still creamy but not loaded with butter and cream (yogurt is the key).  See my recipe, below.

This dinner took some effort to put together and is definitely not one of your thirty-minute-meals, but it was well worth the extra kitchen duty.

Behold, my healthier Indian meal of salmon cakes with apple pear and cashew chutney and saag paneer, served over basmati rice.

Salmon cakes with saag paneer and rice

Big N loved it, and I think he was happy enough not to be dragged to another Indian restaurant where we always leave smelling like burnt curry and smoke.  Try my healthier version of saag paneer the next time you have a hankering for Indian. 

Saag Paneer: Spinach with Indian Cheese

Serves 2-3
Prep time 2 hours
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 2 hours, 15 minutes
Meal type Side Dish
Region Indian

Ingredients

Paneer

  • 4 cups Whole milk
  • 1/4 cup Vinegar (Regular white/distilled)

Saag

  • 12 oz Baby spinach (2 small bags)
  • 1/2 medium Onion (finely diced)
  • 1 teaspoon Curry powder (or to taste)
  • 1/4 cup Yogurt (Plain or greek style)
  • 1 clove Garlic (finely chopped)

Saag (Optional)

  • 1/2 teaspoon Ginger (fresh grated)
  • 1 teaspoon Garam masala
  • Parsley or cilantro (chopped)

Note

If you don't have fresh spinach, you can substitute 1 16 oz package of frozen chopped spinach. Just let it defrost and squeeze out all of the water.

Also, feel free to experiment with your spices. You can use a combination of garam masala, curry powder, cumin powder, coriander, cayenne, and tumeric (go easy on the tumeric though).  Have fun with it.

Directions

1. First make the paneer: boil the milk over medium heat. This takes some time, keep stirring and do not let it burn the bottom of your pot. Make sure it is boiling, not just scalding.
2.
Add the vinegar and stir until the whey separates from the curds. It'll look like this:
3.
Put multiple layers of cheesecloth over a colander and pour the mixture. The whey will drain out, leaving you with the solids in your cheesecloth.
4.
When it's cool enough to handle, twist the ends of the cheesecloth and squeeze out every last drop you can.
5.
Put the cheesecloth filled with your cheese in a bowl or dish (or keep it in your colander with a bowl underneath to catch the liquid that will continue to drain out) and weigh it down (I used pie weights). Let the water drain for an hour or two, or overnight in your refrigerator for firmer paneer.
6.
When it's done, remove the paneer from the cheesecloth and cut it into cubes. The paneer will keep in a covered container for up to five days in the refrigerator.
7. While your paneer is in the fridge, prepare a pot of salted water and boil. Add the spinach all at once, stir. Blanch the spinach for just 1 minute. Pour spinach into a colander to drain and rinse quickly with cold water. When cooled, squeeze out all of the water you can from the spinach. You want it as dry as you can or your saag will be runny. When the water has been squeezed out, place spinach on your cutting board and finely chop it.
8. Heat a pan on the stove and add whatever spices you've decided to use into the dry pan. Toast your spices. You're done when the spices become fragrant (about 1 minute over medium heat). Remove spices from pan.
9.
Next heat about 2 teaspoons of olive, canola, or grapeseed oil in the pan. (You can use ghee or clarified butter too, but oil is healthier). Add the cubed paneer and season with salt. Lightly brown on all sides. Then remove paneer from pan.
10.
Add a little more oil and saute the onions, garlic, and ginger (if using) until onions are translucent. Don't burn the garlic. Add your spinach and the toasted spices and heat until everything is incorporated and hot.
11.
Remove from the heat and stir in yogurt (do this at the very end before serving or the yogurt might start to separate). The mixture will be creamy and thick. Fold in the paneer cubes and season with salt if needed. Serve immediately, garnishing with chopped parsley or cilantro if desired.

Round 2: Spicy Pickled Carrots and other cliches

It occurred to me that I’ve neglected to catch you up, dear readers, on my goings on.  I forgot to mention that a few months ago, as the last requirement to finish my culinary program, I began working at a wonderful upscale Pasadena restaurant that mixes seasonal fare with a bit of fusion.  I served as a prep cook and manned the garde manger station during dinner service (where I prepared cold foods, salads, appetizers, and desserts).  I also started working with the restaurant’s catering element for large off-site events.  I actually loved my job — the fast paced orders, serving the customers, hearing them praise my dishes, working with the chef de cuisine on tasting menus and collaborating on new dishes, and just being in a commercial kitchen with other cooks  — only the late nights and weekends were killing both me and Big N.  We quickly learned that restaurant life was mutually exclusive to my other jobs as part-time attorney and full-time mommy.  So when my externship was up, so were my days at the restaurant, though I do miss it.  In November I graduated culinary school, with honors I might add, and am now a classically trained cook.  Yippee!

And while I’m sharing, Fin is going to be a big brother.  Yup, we’re expecting, again.  Though my little kidney bean is due in August, it hasn’t yet sunk in that I’m going to have my hands very full very soon.  In the meantime, I’m working on my next big project but haven’t quite figured out which direction to go.  Do I become a private chef and cook in my clients’ homes for their fancy dinner parties?  Do I start a little baking business?  Do I get another job in a restaurant or bake shop that allows me to work in the daytime?  All questions for which I have zero answers, at the moment anyway.

Which brings me to pickles.  I lost 5 pounds working at the restaurant.  I called it the restaurant diet, which entailed 12 hour shifts standing on my feet, very hard sweaty manual labor in a steamy kitchen, absolutely no time to eat.  So now that I’m starting this pregnancy with a weight deficit, I have a little wiggle room to have some fun.  Bring on the ice cream, and the pickles, and all the other cliches because this time around I’m going hog wild (I’m even going full rebel mode and eating sushi, don’t judge).

I’ve always loved pickles.  You can pickle anything and I’ll eat it.  Pickled eggs? Reminds me of Beijing, sure.  Pickled purslane?  Looks like a weed but I’ll eat it and love it.  Pickled bacon?  I’ll try anything once.

Spicy pickled carrots

This week I had a hankering for those spicy pickled carrots you can find at good taquerias.  Kidney bean needs his/her veggies.  Plus I bought too many carrots and Fin has decided he’s not eating them anymore.  The carrots are easy to make and take about 25 minutes, plus refrigeration time because warm pickles aren’t my fave.  Simply boil your vinegar and water, add the spices, then the carrots, and simmer until the carrots reach your desired al dente-ness (I still like a little crunch to mine). 

Now that I have a nice big jar in my fridge, I’m eating them with everything.  Try my recipe, below.

Joke all your want, pickled anything + preggers = happy me.

Spicy Pickled Carrots

Prep time 10 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 25 minutes
Meal type Condiment, Side Dish, Snack
Region Mexican

Ingredients

  • 1 lb Baby Carrots (Peeled, cut in half lengthwise)
  • 1 1/2 cup White Distilled Vinegar
  • 1 cup Water
  • 1 tablespoon Juniper Berries
  • 2 Bay Leaves
  • 2 teaspoons Mustard Seeds
  • 2 cloves Garlic
  • 2 teaspoons Black Peppercorns
  • 3/4 oz Chiles de Arbol (Dried, available at Mexican markets)
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt (or to taste)
  • 1 teaspoon Cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon Coriander seeds

Optional

  • 1/4 cup Vegetable oil

Note

Feel free to substitute regular carrots, sliced about 3/4" thick, for the baby carrots.  Also, this seems like a lot of chiles, but don't worry too much.  The carrots have a nice spiciness to them, but won't be so spicy that you can't eat a bunch.  Unless of course you have no tolerance for spiciness, in which case I think the title of this recipe will cause you to move on anyway.   If you don't want them to be too spicy, take the chiles out before you put them in your storage jar.

Inspired by recipe from Ninfa's in Houston, available here, but I adapted this recipe to my liking.

Directions

1.
Add water, vinegar, oil, and dried chiles to medium pot. Bring to boil. Reduce to medium and boil 5 minutes.
2.
Add all spices and boil on medium for another 5 minutes.
3. Add carrots and garlic cloves, making sure liquid covers all carrots, and simmer for 10 minutes, or until carrots reach desired tenderness. Check to make sure you added enough salt and adjust if necessary.
4. Cool and store in sealed container. Will keep in the refrigerator for one month.

 

TamaraEsq’s First Catering Gig: Miso Black Cod, Escarole, Black Forbidden Rice

My neighbor, the cardiologist/budding photographer, and I, the lawyer/budding chef, get along very well.  He’s taught me a thing or two about photography, and generously set up his home studio to take pictures of Fin for his sixth month birthday.  I appreciate these things, so I decided to thank him in trade: dinner for his family on me.  I’m treating it like my first (pro bono) catering gig.

Since he’s a heart doctor, he wisely limits his intake of red meat, so I went with fish and made an old favorite, miso black cod with coconut miso sauce, forbidden black dirty rice, and sauteed escarole with red peppers and mandarin oranges.  I made everything at home, packed it to go, then plated dinner up at my neighbor’s house.  I had to return to Fin and feed Big N, so I didn’t stay to hear their review.  When I made the dish a few minutes later for Big N and I, I realized that my miso marinade could have been sweeter, my escarole could have been crisper, and my rice could have been warmer, but I hope they enjoyed it anyway.  I hate when my food doesn’t meet my own standards.

I do think the sauteed escarole recipe, a concoction I invented last night, contrasted nicely with the fish.  The fish is a little sweet, and the escarole slightly bitter, but not as bitter as mustard or dandelion greens.  Plus the mandarin oranges went well with the asian coconut flavors I had going on.  Escarole is healthy leafy green vegetable that’s simple enough to make at home when you’re sick of the usual spinach, kale, or chard.  Try it.  Even better, be neighborly and make enough to share.  Sauteed escarole recipe is below.

Sauteed Escarole

Serves 3
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 20 minutes
Meal type Side Dish

Ingredients

  • 1 head Escarole
  • 1 Red bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup Grilled corn (use left overs or Trader Joe's sells grilled corn in the frozen section)
  • 1 can Mandarin oranges
  • Olive or grape seed oil (as needed)

Directions

1. Wash and spin or pat dry the escarole. Chop into 1/2 inch chiffonade.
2. Roast and peel bell pepper: place on open gas burner with flame on high. When skin blisters and turns black, turn. Continue to turn over the flame until all black then immediately place in bowl covered with plastic wrap. Wait 5 minutes while steam loosens skin. Then peel with hands or rub a paper towel over it. Slice the roasted bell pepper in thin 1/4? slices.
3. Heat grape seed oil in saute pan on medium high. Add escarole, stir until escarole starts to wilt. Cover and simmer to let steam slowly cook escarole until just al dente, about 5 minutes.
4. Add bell pepper, grilled corn, and mandarin oranges and cook until just heated through. Season with salt and a little white pepper to taste.

Fillet ‘o fish: Branzino with Tarragon Pesto

At my local Seafood City or Whole Foods, I used to pass up beautiful whole fish glistening on ice in favor of boring prefabricated fillets because I was too scared to fillet them myself.  Now that I’ve dabbled in fish fabrication, I march right up to the fish monger and say, with total confidence: “gimme 2 of the whole Branzino over there and will you dress* them for me please?”  (Of course, shopping while still wearing my lovely checkered pants from culinary school may not be fashionable outside of the food industry, but at Whole Foods the pants give me street cred).

Branzino is a European bass species and is a delicate white fish that tastes like a cross between sole and trout.  You’re welcome to cook them whole, but Big N doesn’t like to work so hard for his food so I filleted mine, plus I needed to practice my filleting chops.  After filleting, I put the rest of the bodies into the freezer to be used for fish stock later (I think I’ll make a shrimp bisque for a future post).  I then pan sauteed the branzino with the skin on and served them drizzled with tarragon pesto, my own little concoction.  For sides I blanched some haricot vert (skinny French green beans), then sauteed them with roasted red pepper and lardon (bacon), a dish we made in class a while back.  (See branzino with tarragon pesto and haricot vert recipes, below).  I also had a gorgeous yellow beet so I cut it into rounds, drizzled with oil and salt, and roasted the sliced beet in the oven for about 45 minutes until nice and tender.

No wine last night– it’s good to take a night off once in a while (says Big N).  The fish didn’t need it anyway.  The branzino was light and delicate but flavorful, and the tarragon pesto with the lemon juice brought a freshness to the dish.  The green beans and red peppers with the delicious golden beets contributed nice color and flavor without the need for any carbs or starchy sides.  Totally satisfying.

*Lingo lesson: “dressed” fish are gutted and scaled but with the head, fins, and tails still in tact.  I’m not afraid to do this myself, but scaling is a messy job and the fish mongers wear waders for protection from flying scales.

branzino-5-of-5

Branzino with Tarragon Pesto

Serves 2
Prep time 15 minutes
Cook time 10 minutes
Total time 25 minutes
Meal type Main Dish

Ingredients

  • 2 pieces Branzino (whole is best, or 2 fillets per person, trout works too)
  • 1 heaped tablespoon Tarragon (chopped)
  • 1 heaped tablespoon Parsley (Italian or flat leaf)
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil (I like regular, not extra virgin for this recipe)
  • 1/8 cup Pine nuts
  • 1/2 Lemon
  • 2 pieces Branzino (whole is best, or 2 fillets per person, trout works too)
  • 1 heaped tablespoon Tarragon (chopped)
  • 1 heaped tablespoon Parsley (Italian or flat leaf)
  • 1/4 cup Olive oil (I like regular, not extra virgin for this recipe)
  • 1/8 cup Pine nuts
  • 1/2 Lemon

Directions

1. Filet the fish, leaving skin on. Season with salt and pepper on both sides.
2. Filet the fish, leaving skin on. Season with salt and pepper on both sides.
3. Toast pine nuts in a dry hot pan until they just start to turn brown and become fragrant.
4. Toast pine nuts in a dry hot pan until they just start to turn brown and become fragrant.
5. Make the pesto: using a food processor, blender, or stick blender, blend tarragon, parsley and pine nuts. Squeeze in the juice from the lemon (no seeds). Slowly add oil while running blender until incorporated. Add a little salt.
6. Make the pesto: using a food processor, blender, or stick blender, blend tarragon, parsley and pine nuts. Squeeze in the juice from the lemon (no seeds). Slowly add oil while running blender until incorporated. Add a little salt.
7. Place oil in saute pan and heat on high until it slides easily across the pan but isn’t smoking. Place fish in oil, skin side down, for about 3 minutes depending on thickness of fish. Turn and cook another minute or two until fish is cooked through but still just a tad translucent inside.
8. Place oil in saute pan and heat on high until it slides easily across the pan but isn’t smoking. Place fish in oil, skin side down, for about 3 minutes depending on thickness of fish. Turn and cook another minute or two until fish is cooked through but still just a tad translucent inside.
9. Serve skin side up, drizzled with tarragon pesto.
10. Serve skin side up, drizzled with tarragon pesto.

Haricot Vert with Roasted Red Pepper and Lardon

Serves 2
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 10 minutes
Total time 15 minutes
Meal type Side Dish
Region French

Ingredients

  • 8 oz Haricot vert or green beans
  • 1 Red bell pepper
  • 2 oz Thick cut bacon or salt pork
  • 8 oz Haricot vert or green beans
  • 1 Red bell pepper
  • 2 oz Thick cut bacon or salt pork

Directions

1. Blanch green beans by placing in boiling salted water until just starting to get tender but not too soggy. Remove from water and immediately place in ice bath. Remove from ice when cool and dry on towel.
2. Blanch green beans by placing in boiling salted water until just starting to get tender but not too soggy. Remove from water and immediately place in ice bath. Remove from ice when cool and dry on towel.
3. Roast red pepper by putting directly onto gas burner with high flame. When the skin turns black then turn it and continue to turn until the skin is all charred black. Immediately put in container covered with plastic wrap to sweat. When cool, remove the skin by rubbing off with a paper towel. Cut in half to remove seeds and white pith, then slice in 1/4" slices.
4. Roast red pepper by putting directly onto gas burner with high flame. When the skin turns black then turn it and continue to turn until the skin is all charred black. Immediately put in container covered with plastic wrap to sweat. When cool, remove the skin by rubbing off with a paper towel. Cut in half to remove seeds and white pith, then slice in 1/4" slices.
5. Slice bacon in 1/4" pieces.
6. Slice bacon in 1/4" pieces.
7. Saute bacon until fat is rendered. Add blanched beans and roasted red pepper. Add salt to taste. Saute until beans are cooked but still slightly al dente. Drain on paper towel if too greasy just before serving.
8. Saute bacon until fat is rendered. Add blanched beans and roasted red pepper. Add salt to taste. Saute until beans are cooked but still slightly al dente. Drain on paper towel if too greasy just before serving.

And one more flavor match: Lamb and Mint with Raisin Red Chard

Since I appear to be on a flavor match kick, we might as well go for one more: lamb and mint.  I don’t know why the two go together.  Maybe the little lamb like to feast on wild mint, or maybe they tend to have halitosis and mint takes care of that, but regardless, on the plate, lamb and mint just work.

For dinner last night I picked up these beautiful rib loin chops from New Zealand (I know, local is best, tsk tsk, but whatever. The New Zealanders have some tasty sheep).  I also have some pineapple mint growing nicely in a pot that was crying out to be used.  I hadn’t heard of pineapple mint either but it tastes like mint and smells like pineapple, which is where I guess they get the name.  I made a quick infused oil with the mint, and a special dry rub to complement the mint oil for the lamb.  Big N plopped the chops on the barbecue so I could get working on the chard.  For the red chard, I added raisins, pine nuts, garlic, and balsalmic vinegar to my saute.  The sweetness of the raisins went well to balance out the mint on the lamb.  For vino we served it with Babcock’s Nucleus Bordeaux blend from Santa Rita Hills area of Santa Barbara County.  Spicy, with boysenberry and violet on the nose, this was the perfect match for the minty lamb.

Another scrumptious meal, made even more special with some good wine.  (See my recipes for lamb with mint and raisin red chard below.

Cheers.

lamb-chard-4-of-5

Lamb loin chops with mint infused oil

Serves 2
Prep time 20 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 35 minutes
Meal type Main Dish

Ingredients

  • 7 Lamb loin or rib chops
  • 1-2 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon Garam masala
  • 1 teaspoon Ground coriander
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon Brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon Black pepper (Freshly ground)
  • 2 tablespoons Mint (Finely chopped)
  • 3 tablespoons Olive or grape seed oil

Directions

1. Make spice rub by combining spices and stirring together.
2. Rub over the lamb and let sit for 20 minutes.
3. In a small dish, add mint and a little kosher salt to the oil and let sit.
4. Grill lamb until done. Let rest for a few minutes.
5. Serve lamb topped with mint infused oil.

Red Chard with Raisins and Pine Nuts

Serves 2
Prep time 5 minutes
Cook time 15 minutes
Total time 20 minutes
Meal type Side Dish

Ingredients

  • 1 Red Chard
  • 1/8 cup Raisins
  • 2 tablespoons Pine Nuts
  • 1 clove Garlic
  • 1 tablespoon Balsamic Vinegar

Directions

1. Cut chard stems into 1 inch pieces. Cut remaining leaves into 1 inch ribbons.
2. Toast pine nuts but placing in the bottom of a dry pan heated over a medium flame. Toast until fragrant, stirring every couple of minutes, about 4 minutes total.
3. Remove pine nuts and add a little oil to pan. When hot, saute chard stems, about 4 minutes.
4. Add leaves, raisins, and garlic.
5. Season with salt and a little pepper and cover. Simmer over low heat 6-10 minutes until tender. Add 1 T water if necessary to prevent burning.
6. Uncover, add vinegar and pine nuts. Serve.