Flavor Bible Unleashed: Sea Bass with Apple Fennel Saute and White Bean Puree

flavor-bible The “cookbook” I find myself turning to most often is not a cookbook at all, but reads more like a primer on flavor affinities.  The Flavor Bible doesn’t include recipes per se, but instead instructs on what foods go together.  I consult The Flavor Bible when I have a few items picked up from the store, but I’m fishing for ideas on how to jazz them up.  Tonight, for example, I had some Chilean Sea Bass marinating in misoyaki sauce (recipe for misoyaki fish, below), and wanted to cook fennel and white beans for sides.  I consulted my trusty Flavor Bible, dinner-4-of-7 and discovered that white beans pair well with olive oil, rosemary, and even pecorino.  Having all of those ingredients on hand, I decided a puree would be lovely (plus I adore my stick blender, it gives off such a gratifying buzzing sensation when it mashes food)!  So I heated up white beans with a little chicken broth, olive oil, and chopped rosemary, then pureed with my stick blender and returned to the stove. I seasoned and added the pecorino and stirred until creamy.
Recipe for White Bean Puree

A quick turn of the page and I learned that fennel goes well with apples. I had an apple handy so apple fennel saute was what I made.  Chopped the fennel and apple and sauteed together until soft, then added nigella (black sesame seeds), red grapes, and fennel greens for color, plus a smidge of cider vinegar for a little zing, because fennel usually needs some acid.
Recipe for Appel Fennel Saute

In under 25 minutes I had dinner on the table and a happy hubby.  Big N paired our meal with a sauvignon blanc that we brought back from Marlborough, New Zealand this March.  If you think most Sauvignon Blancs wreak of cat pee, you haven’t had one from New Zealand.  The River Farm Sauvignon Blanc is typical for the region, with notes of white peach and a little grass, and crisp but smooth tropical citrus fruits on the palette.  It paired perfectly with the slight acidity of the fennel and the richness of the fish.  While sipping the wine, Big N and I reminisced about our adventures in New Zealand biking from one winery to the next and filling up our baskets to the brim with Pinots and Sauvignon Blancs.  Next time you’re eating white fish, or something spicy or acidic, try a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc.  They’re great value wines and there’s no need to have a corkscrew with you- nearly all of them have screw tops for added convenience.

Misoyaki Fish

Serves 2-4
Prep time 48 hours
Cook time 20 minutes
Total time 48 hours, 20 minutes
Meal type Main Dish
Region Japanese

Ingredients

  • 2-4 Filets of fish (Chilean sea bass, black cod, butterfish work best)
  • 1/2 cup Sake
  • 1/2 cup Mirin (cooking wine, find it in asian food aisle)
  • 1/3 cup Miso paste (in asian markets, light color works best)
  • 3 tablespoons Sugar
  • 2-4 Filets of fish (Chilean sea bass, black cod, butterfish work best)
  • 1/2 cup Sake
  • 1/2 cup Mirin (cooking wine, find it in asian food aisle)
  • 1/3 cup Miso paste (in asian markets, light color works best)
  • 3 tablespoons Sugar

Note

Inspired by Chef Nobu's famous misoyaki black cod and Roy's Miso Butterfish recipes

Directions

1. Heat sake, Mirin, miso paste, and sugar. Whisk to dissolve miso paste and sugar, bring to just boiling, and simmer on low heat for 15 minutes. Let cool completely.
2. Heat sake, Mirin, miso paste, and sugar. Whisk to dissolve miso paste and sugar, bring to just boiling, and simmer on low heat for 15 minutes. Let cool completely.
3. Throw cooled sauce in ziploc bag and add your fish. Suck the air out of the bag and place in a bowl in the refrigerator. Let the fish marinate for 2-3 days, turning the bag over in the fridge each morning or evening to make sure the fish is being evenly coated.
4. Throw cooled sauce in ziploc bag and add your fish. Suck the air out of the bag and place in a bowl in the refrigerator. Let the fish marinate for 2-3 days, turning the bag over in the fridge each morning or evening to make sure the fish is being evenly coated.
5. Preheat oven to 400. Place fish in baking dish, uncovered, and discard rest of marinade.
6. Preheat oven to 400. Place fish in baking dish, uncovered, and discard rest of marinade.
7. Bake for 10-20 minutes depending on thickness of fish. Insert toothpick to test, toothpick should go in easily if done. Do not overcook fish, you want it slightly translucent in the middle.
8. Bake for 10-20 minutes depending on thickness of fish. Insert toothpick to test, toothpick should go in easily if done. Do not overcook fish, you want it slightly translucent in the middle.

Trackbacks

  1. […] doctor, he wisely limits his intake of red meat, so I went with fish and made an old favorite, miso black cod with coconut miso sauce, forbidden black dirty rice, and sauteed escarole with red peppers and […]

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